The Definition of White Tie and Thoughts on the Met Gala

White–tie adjective: 

characterized by or requiring the wearing of formal evening clothes consisting of white tie

and tailcoat for men and a formal gown for women <a white–tie dinner>

The most formal of dress codes, fancier than The Oscars, and a rare occasion indeed. The only time men wear tailcoats, and women wear evening gloves. So why were the majority of attendees at this years Charles James white-tie gala, dressed like they were going to a Golden Globes after party? Hollywood… *eyeroll*

Charles James was an English-born Couturier who came to fame dressing high society ladies in Chicago and New York during the 1940's and 1950's. Not much was every spoken about James, he sort of disappeared. I discovered James when I kept pinning his dresses and researched who he was. Shortly thereafter Bazaar published a story on him, and now he's got a retrospective at The Met opening. The modern incarnation of James, is Zac Posen, and if you know anything of James' designs that is stunningly obvious. 

He may look like a Renaissance Chancellor, but Posen will always overshoot a dress code, than underdress. Dita VonTeese's gown is his modern take on James' famous Clover Gown designed for Augustine Hearst in the 1950's. 

He may look like a Renaissance Chancellor, but Posen will always overshoot a dress code, than underdress. Dita VonTeese's gown is his modern take on James' famous Clover Gown designed for Augustine Hearst in the 1950's. 

Personally speaking, I would've jumped at the chance to go big or go home with the white-tie dress code. When else in your life could you wear satin opera gloves and your man, a dinner jacket with coat tails?! It's so Kate and Leopold. By the way, ticket price for a seat at Le Met Ball- $25,000 (Not that any of these actors paid).

But alas, Hollywood's starlets and stylists kept it typical, if not disrespectful, with bare midriffs and short hemlines. Click through for my completely guttural, honest, and probably harsh reviews.